Showing posts with label art in context. Show all posts
Showing posts with label art in context. Show all posts

Thursday, 4 April 2013

LIVING WITH Art

As seen in SNAP – April 2013

 

Often I think that the associations with the word “Art” are too strong and misunderstood. Art does not only belong in museums, public buildings or city landscapes. Art also belongs in your home, your bedroom, your bathroom, and your garden.

 

Recently while working on a project with a client in some part of the process I mentioned that we needed to consider some art pieces for the focal point of the room and other walls. My client looked hesitant " But I can't afford art in my space, art is so expensive! " Well I said. "Art doesn’t need to be expensive; It only needs to speak to you and your surroundings".

 

You can find really interesting pieces even in second hand stores. When you bring art to a living environment you bring interest and a more sophisticated feel. Art impacts space in a very personal way. One's art selections can reflect one's mood, vibrancy, culture, and even one's sense of humour in some cases. Art is for me a "stamp in your letter" (Spanish saying) or the icing on the cake for you Canadian people.

 

I have always been fortunate to be surrounded by art. I always thought that having art in your home was as common as having a dish washer or an iron. But this thought started changing when I realized that people often get intimidated by the word and by the art itself. Art can be found in so many ways – Paintings, Sketches, Photographs, Etchings, Sculptures, Masks, Object d’Art, or even an item of nostalgic value. Art can be expensive – yes! , but also art can be inexpensive; a simple framed napkin with a sketch on it can be art in itself. I wish I could have a sketch by Frank Gehry for example. Why not frame the latest cover of Rolling Stone Magazine or a black and white photograph from a Magazine - Art can be social and art can be political, but the most important thing is that art can be everywhere you are - just need to find it and make it yours.

 

 

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Sketch by Frank Gehry

 

Here are some examples of Meade Design Group projects where we have use art.

 

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African Masks + Engravings – Shoal Point Residence

 

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Hand Sketch and Bust – Sherman Oaks

 

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"Man and the Bird" by Artist Cony Valdes - Marifield Project

 

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Black & White Photography – The Village



MEADE DESIGN GROUP - THE BLOG. Copyright 2007-2011

Tuesday, 13 November 2012

ORIGINAL ART AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

GUEST ENTRY

Not too long ago I received a very kind email from Renee Crawford about the amazing service that the ART Gallery of Greater Victoria offers.  A brilliant service that I have used in the past, it’s a great way to bring original art to any project at an affordable price point while supporting our local ART Gallery and our ART community.

 

My name is Renee Crawford, and I run the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria’s Art Rental and Sales program. What is that, you ask? Well, it’s the city’s largest inventory of rentable and buyable contemporary local art, with hundreds of pieces of original work.

 

With low monthly rental fees (starting at $20 per month) and no commitment to purchase, original art work has never been more accessible! Perfect for decorating and staging homes and businesses, contemporary art work easily transforms a room into an unforgettable experience. Contemporary art can provide colour, ambience, a focal point, and can considerably increase the “cool” quotient. It can help sell a home, increase a business profile, and complete the look and feel of any space.

 

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Who uses the program? A vast array of people, from homeowners and renters to interior designers, home stagers, film companies, offices, corporations; anyone who has wall space could benefit from hanging a piece of amazing local art. For those who decide they can’t live without the work, we offer up to six months of rental fees towards purchase.

 

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What kinds of art do we have to offer? We have the most comprehensive cross-section of local work in the city, with work in almost every genre, and limitless sizes and shapes. From watercolour to oil and acrylic paintings, printmaking pieces, mixed media and more, we have something for everyone. Need to fill a really big space? We have large scale works and can bring in works on demand as well. All of our work is stored here at the Art Rental and Sales office at the Art Gallery (1040 Moss St.), ready to be viewed by appointment.

 

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Not sure what kind of art to hang? No problem! We offer professional consultations, delivery and installation services. We also offer an online archive that you can browse from the comfort of your own home or office.

 

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Make an appointment today to come in and view our inventory, and browse our online archive for inspiration:

 

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For more information call 250. 384. 4171 ext. 222 or email rcrawford@aggv.ca.



MEADE DESIGN GROUP - THE BLOG. Copyright 2007-2011

Sunday, 1 January 2012

The salish weave collection

As seen in SNAP Victoria, January 2012


The Salish Weave Collection is a private collection of contemporary Salish art which has travelled to various museums and galleries throughout the world. Recently, I got invited to a private tour of the collection by George and Christiane Smyth (who are the brains behind this incredible collection), where I learned about Salish Art and how important it is to support this art form in our community. Did you know that all Salish artwork is created with only 3 distinctive shapes? The Oval, Crescent and Trigon.


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Salmon Headdress by John Marston


A portion of this collection has been donated in memory of Dr. Morgan Baker, and is on display at the Cornett Building in UVIC, which you can visit in a self-guided walking tour. Another fun piece of trivia that I learned is that the Cornett building houses only Salish art. You can see more pieces on loan at the First People House on campus as well.


The main purpose of the collection is to support the recognition of this art form from the north west coast of North America. The main goal is to promote talented artists like Susan A. Point, Chris Paul, Maynard Johnny Jr., John Marston, LessLIE, and Dylan Thomas who are all featured in this collection, amongst others.


A significant part of this collection will be exhibited during The Victoria Collects exhibition at the Art Gallery of Victoria from January 6 to May 6, 2012. I had a great opportunity to learn more about the Salish culture and I would recommend taking advantage of this rare exhibition to all locals.


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Written Into The Earth by Susan A.Point – In loan at Simon Fraser University


Here is my conversation with activist collectors George & Christiane Smyth the brains behind “The Salish Wave Collection” :


Iván Meade - Why is it so important to support Salish artists?


George & Christiane Smyth – Because there is a renaissance of Coast Salish art, a Northwest Coast indigenous art form practiced in the southern part of BC and the northern part of Washington state.


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Salmon Spirits by Dylan Thomas


Iván Meade - Why/When did you start The Salish Weave Collection?


George & Christiane Smyth – In 1999, we purchased some prints and a glass top table by Susan Point to decorate our first Victoria condo. Within the next couple of years, we purchased more Coast Salish artworks and realized we were attracted to this lesser known Northwest Coast indigenous art. We then thought we could build a significant collection by focusing on contemporary Coast Salish art.


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Ravens & Moon by Susan A. Point


Iván Meade - I know the collection has been around the world - Where has the collection been?


George & Christiane Smyth – Actually, the signature piece that inspired the name of the collection, ‘’Yellow and Red Cedar Weave’’ by Susan Point, was part of the exhibition Challenging Traditions: Contemporary First Nations Art of the Northwest Coast curated by Ian M. Thom for the McMichael Canadian Art Collection of Ontario. Part of this exhibition travelled to the Olympic Museum in Lausanne, Switzerland where it was on display in the spring of 2010 to celebrate the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics.


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Yellow and Red Cedar Weave by Susan A. Point


Iván Meade - Part of the collection is currently at the Cornett building in UVIC as a self-guided walking tour - What was the reasoning housing the collection at UVIC?


George & Christiane Smyth – Most of the prints on display in the Cornett building were gifted from the Salish Weave Collection after we learned that Peter Keller, Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences, had agreed to dedicate this building, located next to the First Peoples House, to contemporary Coast Salish art. Other pieces on display are a large multi-media work by Susan Point as well as a large piece by Chris Paul who was the first Coast Salish artist to participate in the artist-in-residence program initiated by Dr. Andrea Walsh, professor of Visual Anthropology. We were grateful for the opportunity to bring awareness of this art form within the walls of an institution of knowledge and learning, as was the Faculty for the ability to honor the First Peoples on whose traditional territory the university stands. As Dean Keller said, the stars aligned, allowing this project to meet common objectives.


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Reflections by lessLIE


Iván Meade - Who are your favourite Salish artists and why?


George & Christiane Smyth – It is impossible to answer that question because we like all the artists whose works we collect for different reasons. Artworks from Susan Point constitute the largest part of our collection. Susan is the leader of the renaissance of Coast Salish art. She is known for the versatility and complexity of her designs rendered in a variety of media such as paper, wood, glass, metal and stone. She is an inspiration to young Salish artists.


We like the Marston’s siblings: John, a master wood carver, who experimented with printmaking and glass works; Luke, also a master carver, who recently learned and used the repoussé technique on jewelry; and Angela who applies her carving, painting and weaving abilities to the creation of rattles.


We like lessLIE for his graphic designs and his writing; Maynard Johnny Jr for his imagery and use of colors; Chris Paul for his artistic, technical and business abilities; and young Dylan Thomas for the maturity of his designs and his willingness to explore and push boundaries.


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Coast Salish artist Chris Paul shows his artwork "Finding Balance" in the Cornett Building. Photo: UVic Photo Services.


Iván Meade - What is your favourite personal piece?


George & Christiane Smyth – We both very much like the signature piece of the Salish Weave collection, ‘’Yellow and Red Cedar Weave’’ by Susan Point. John Marston’s panel ‘’Ehhwe’p Syuth’’ (To Share History and Culture), our first acquisition of a ‘museum-like piece’, is also very dear to us. It is on permanent display at the Museum of Anthropology in Vancouver. The ‘’Ravens and Moon’’ glass spindle whorl by Susan Point is also a favourite piece of Christiane as is lessLIE’s print ‘’Protecting Posterity’’ for George.


Iván Meade - What is the most popular piece in the collection?


George & Christiane Smyth – Well, that depends on who is looking at the collection. Family and friends are taken by different pieces as are the art connoisseurs and the curators we have encountered or with whom we had the pleasure to work.


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Coast Salish artist lessLIE with his artwork "Reflections" on the entrance door of Cornett. Photo: UVic Photo Services


Iván Meade - What has been the biggest achievement of The Salish Weave Collection?


George & Christiane Smyth – Privately, it has been the design and the completion of two box sets, each containing nine limited edition of 50 prints. These prints were commissioned from the artists mentioned previously. We have gifted Box Set I to different galleries and universities with the objective of spreading awareness of contemporary Coast Salish art.


Publicly, the permanent display of contemporary Coast Salish art in UVic’s Cornett building, home to the Faculty of Social Sciences, is the most significant achievement to date. Next, is the exhibition of 19 artworks of the Salish Weave Collection as part of the Victoria Collects exhibition at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria. Curated by Mary Jo Hughes, this exhibition, which runs from January 6 to May 6, 2012, is an important milestone for the Salish Weave Collection.


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Conservation by Chris Paul


Iván Meade - What is next for The Salish Weave Collection?


George & Christiane Smyth – More exhibitions and projects with partners such as the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria and UVic and the launch of the Salish Weave Collection website. As always, spreading the awareness of contemporary Coast Salish art further and farther.


To learn more about The Salish Weave Collection please visit:


Victoria Collects: The Salish Weave Collection

Online Guide to Art Displays of the Cornett Building


Ivan Meade is a local designer and principal of Meade Design Group, a multidisciplinary interior design and graphic design studio in the heart of downtown Victoria –www.meadedesigngroup.com



MEADE DESIGN GROUP - THE BLOG. Copyright 2007-2011

Sunday, 24 February 2008

Living with Art


Often I think that the associations with the word “Art” are too strong and misunderstood. Art does not only belong in museums, public buildings or city landscapes. Art also belongs in your home, your bedroom, your bathroom, and your garden.

Recently while working on a project with a client in some part of the process I mentioned that we needed to consider some art pieces for the focal point of the room and other walls. My client looked hesitant " But I can't afford art in my space, art is so expensive! " Well I said. "Art doesn’t need to be expensive; It only needs to speak to you and your surroundings".

You can find really interesting pieces even in second hand stores. When you bring art to a living environment you bring interest and a more sophisticated feel. Art impacts space in a very personal way. One's art selections can reflect one's mood, vibrancy, culture, and even one's sense of humour in some cases. Art is for me a "stamp in your letter" (Spanish saying) or the icing on the cake for you Canadian people.

I have always been fortunate to be surrounded by art. I always thought that having art in your home was as common as having a dish washer or an iron. But this thought started changing when I realized that people often get intimidated by the word and by the art itself. Art can be found in so many ways – Paintings, Sketches, Photographs, Etchings, Sculptures, Masks, Object d’Art, or even an item of nostalgic value. Art can be expensive – yes! , but also art can be inexpensive; a simple framed napkin with a sketch on it can be art in itself. I wish I could have a sketch by Frank Gehry for example. Why not frame the latest cover of Rolling Stone Magazine with Britney Spears - Inside an American Tragedy? Art can be social and art can be political, but the most important thing is that art can be everywhere you are - just need to find it and make it yours.



Frank Gehry sketch of the Disney Music Hall in Los Angeles


Here are some example of some projects where I have use art.




African Masks - Shoal Point Project




Framed Fornassetti's Eve Wall Paper - Meade Design Group Studio




Etching and Handcarved Pho Dog - Shoal Point Project




"Man and the Bird" by Artist Cony Valdes - Marifield Project




Acid Photographs & Bar Code Panelling - Maple Bay Project




Handpainted Chinese Roll and Budha Head - Kona Project


For more pictures please visit
http://www.themeadegroup.com/






MEADE DESIGN GROUP - THE BLOG. Copyright 2007-2011

Sunday, 3 February 2008

Interview with Richard Roblin

I have always seen Vancouver Island as a very unique place; an island that is surprisingly full of design talents. You can find internationally recognized architects, interior designers, graphic designers, artists, set designers, sculptors and so on. A place where the inspiration doesn't get insular but rather is creating a unique voice in its final approach. Because of this I have decided to call my colleagues and friends and interview them and then in this way I can share their secrets, their works, their favourite things to do, their inspiration and most importantly share who the design talents on our island are.

Artist, architect, sculptor, and overall naturalist Richard Roblin is one of the island's talents that I have the great opportunity to know. Who can resist an invitation to his place - a place that will be soon featured in Boulevard magazine? I have always had a fascination with artists' studios. When you see an artist's studio you can begin to comprehend the extent of their work and so when I received a lunch invitation to Richard's new house I could not refuse. After having a wonderful Bouillabaisse soup perfectly prepared by Eve (Richard's wife) we went to his studio and had a fascinating chat about his art, his work, and his inspirations. Here are excerpts from our conversations.




Richard Roblin
http://www.richardroblin.com/

Richard Roblin's Studio


Ivan - Can you give some background on yourself?

Richard - To start with, I’m not an architect, but I have always held architecture as one of the great arts. My choice when I was in my teens was to go to architecture school or develop myself as an artist. I decided to do both. Direct from the early days I started to paint and what I painted was primarily the structure of nature and how it translated into the structure of creation itself, the creation of buildings and the creation of environments. That’s always been my primary interest in life, discovering new ways of creating environments that instil contemplative and inspirational spaces with a passion for beauty.

I guess my passion for beauty was instilled through my love of nature. I was inspired by Frank Lloyd Wrights’ philosophy of integration which is primary to my point of view as well, that there is nothing separate from nature.

Roblin Residence 2008 - Duncan, BC



Ivan - What do you think dominates your art? The use of colour or the use of form?

Richard -
Atmosphere. I don’t believe we are separate from the atmosphere we are in. The information, knowledge and inspirations that are there are compounded by being in a specific place and you are drawing the energy of the place. It’s the energy and response of a given place, it’s always shifting, it’s ephemeral.



Art in Context - Private Residence Montreal
http://www.richardroblin.com/


Ivan - Is your art influenced by architecture or your architecture influenced by art?

Richard - I think one informs the other.




House and Home Article
http://www.richardroblin.com/



Ivan - Because you are coming from an architectural background, do you think you have an advantage in the use of scale and proportion and also do use this knowledge in your art pieces?

Richard - I think the aspiration of every artist is to find equilibrium. In nature, everything is very well balanced.



Stephen Haller Fine Arts, New York


Ivan - When you do commission work, how do you keep your integrity as an artist?

Richard - I think there is direct naturalness that goes into the process and a love for the activity. It’s always a unique event.


Awakening - Art in Context
www.richardroblin.com


Ivan - Lately you been translating your art to area rugs, why this media?

Richard - I love to design everything: tables, lamps, sculptures and textiles. I’m interested in creating things. The creative desire is always there.


Untitled
http://www.richardroblin.com/


Ivan - As an artist, who has influenced you form the artistic world?

Richard - Luis Barragán from Mexico. His use of colour, form, and the uniqueness of his designs.


Untitled
www.richardroblin.com


Ivan - Since I first met you over 2 years ago, your work has taken an interesting development and moved away from being very linear to being more organic...

Richard - I tend to work in series. Every form is worth trying, whether it’s organic or linear.



Rosentzeig Collection, Montreal
http://www.richardroblin.com/


Ivan - It is difficult to show your art to full effect when you are showing pictures on the website, how do you try and deal with this?

Richard - I try and present my work on their own, and often in context. I believe that the environment that the work of art is integrated into is part of the artifact because it’s not in a museum. Often when I am presenting my work over the internet I will present it as an idea or inspiration of how it would appear in a living environment - that we live with these artifacts. It’s an everyday experience.

Ivan - We were discussing how technology has influenced our lives, how has technology influenced your art pieces now?

Richard - Well I’m more and more using the computer as in instrument to help in the creative process. I can use the computer to integrate pieces and then alter them to create new inspirations.

It’s all process. There is not a beginning or an end, it’s a continuum. We are always playing in that continuum, in that dance. So I don’t see a beginning or an end, I see the dance. As a dancer I just dance. As a painter I just paint.

Ivan - Coming from Montreal and having travelled extensively, how has your transition to life on Vancouver Island been?

Richard - It’s been a beautiful experience actually. There are no accidents. I always thought one day I would be living here. There is no shortage of inspiration , it’s a great place to be.
So many of my primary inspirations have come from my beautiful wife. Also inspiration comes from mediation which I try to practice every day.


Ivan - Thank you Richard, it's been a pleasure learning about your art and sharing the afternoon with you in your home and studio.



MEADE DESIGN GROUP - THE BLOG. Copyright 2007-2011